NEW

Letter to the Editor: Welcome the Afghani Refugees but Know the Problems

Welcome the Afghani Refugees But Know the Problems   Dear Sir, There is widespread sympathy for resettling Afghans into Britain fleeing from tyranny and persecution and I am supportive of it. Many of them are Muslims and will have every facility to follow their...

Letter to the Editor: Irrational Optimism

  Irrational Optimism Dear Sir, I read the latest [anon.] article from Anglican Futures, EC8087. It is helpful and clear but, for me, there is a deep undercurrent of a seemingly determined [irrational?] optimism. The article outlines the overall workings of...

Letter to the Editor: Covid Restrictions

  Covid Restrictions Dear Sir,  I refer to the letter in Issue 8084 entitled ‘Power belongeth unto Christ’ which Scripturally outlines where all power belongs and exposes the inconsistencies of our Government and their COVID restrictions on the public worship of...

Free Presbyterians Protest COP26 Visit of Pope Francis

Free Presbyterians Protest COP26 visit of Pope Francis  The Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland has sent a protest to the First Minister urging her to resist political and diplomatic ties with the Pope, ahead of the COP26 summit of world leaders in Glasgow in...

Episcopal Church Pays $4,500,000 to Diocese of Ft Worth

Episcopal Church Pays $4,500,000 to Diocese of Fort Worth, Texas By Suzanne Gill With encouragement from the 141st District Court, the Diocese entered into mediation with The Episcopal Church (TEC) in early June to settle claims of the Diocese for attorneys’ fees and...

Report from Anglican Ink on Episcopal Church Legal Spending

Report from Anglican Ink on Episcopal Church Legal Spending By Jeff Walton This report follows on the announcement that the Diocese of Fort Worth received $4,500,000 from the Episcopal Church to cover the expenses incurred by the Diocese after it left the Episcopal...

Pilgrim’s Process: Common Grace by Peter Sanlon

Pilgrim’s Process  By Peter Sanlon Common Grace Loving God is so important for satisfaction and joy in life, that it is easy to mistakenly think only spiritual concerns are important in life. There are many ways for this error to arise: We can think the only truly...

Church in Wales Embraces the Zeitgeist

The Church in Wales Embraces the Zeitgeist Meeting on Monday 6 September, the Governing Body of the Church in Wales, voted to approve same-sex blessings but stopped short of approving marriage. The change does not allow for same-sex marriages in a Church in Wales...

The History of Christianity in Britain and Ireland

The History of Christianity in Britain and Ireland From the first century to the twenty-first Gerald Bray Apollos, 2021 (ISBN: 978-1-78974-120-9, 693pp) Throughout his long academic career Bray has ably straddled both doctrine and ecclesiastical history, so it is no...

Anglican Futures: Knitted Together In Love

Anglican Futures "Knitted together in love" - Should Christian Communities be 'Thicker'? The terms 'thick' and 'thin' have been used by sociologists and political scientists to describe cultures  for decades.  Thick cultures are socio-centric; they tend to be...

Statute of Limitations Proposed for Legacy of Troubles

Statute of Limitations Proposed for Legacy of the Troubles

During the Prime Minister’s Question time on 15 July, PM Johnson announced that the government would be bringing forth a statute of limitations in regard to occurencess committed before the Good Friday Agreement.  

Calling them “legacy proposals,” Johnson said such legislation would enable Northern Ireland to “draw a line under the Troubles”.

The Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis told Parliament that this is “the best way to help Northern Ireland move further along the road to reconciliation” and postulated a “statute of limitations, to apply equally to all Troubles-related incidents”.  

Reactions to the proposals were swift and clear.  All sides involved were against the idea.

Speaking the day after, The Most Revd John McDowell, Archbishop of Armagh of the Church of Ireland said:

‘The announcement yesterday in the House of Commons of the path that the Government intends to follow in relation to Legacy issues in Northern Ireland will have created further heartbreak, frustration and anger for victims of the Troubles. The degree of suffering endured by victims over the years is not something that can be moved on from. It needs to be acknowledged in the full variety of its expression, and dealt with over the long term.

‘Failure to deal with Legacy has probably been the biggest political and societal failing since the signing of the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement. The one principle which all involved have been agreed on is that a general amnesty would be a morally empty response. Regardless of the name it goes under, a general amnesty is what the Government of the United Kingdom is now planning to put in place.

‘“In a repeat of a dismal pattern, once again political interests in Great Britain have been used as the criteria for settling policy in Northern Ireland. Imperfect as they may have been, the carefully worked out provisions of the Stormont House Agreement have been set aside by one of the parties to the Agreement. Of course, that means a further erosion of trust in those who have been entrusted with just and fair government.

“To believe that any process of reconciliation can be advanced by a measure that betrays the trust of victims, and of most ordinary citizens, indicates a profound ignorance of human nature and human suffering, and of the particular conditions of society in Northern Ireland”.

The Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland, the Revd Dr David Bruce responded to the news:  “The Christian understanding of reconciliation rests upon the coming together of love and justice.  Reconciliation is about the work we do now to rest relationships broke by the past, in a way that can lead to a better and shared future for us all.  Michelle O’Neal, Sinn Fein’s Deputy First Minister at Stormont called Johnson’s announcement,“unilateral action” which demonstrated a “complete disregard” for those affected.

By some accounts there are between 3,000 and 3,500 unresolved murder cases from the Troubles.

Previous

Next