NEW

Anglican Futures: Anglican Alphabet Spaghetti

Anglican Futures Anglican Alphabetti Spaghetti A dummies guide to the plethora of organisations and acronyms linked to faithful Anglicans in the UK and Europe. I once spent some time around military personel.  Everything had its own TLA (Three Letter Acronym) right...

Canterbury Tales: Favourite Bible Stories Retold by Archbishop Justin Welby

Canterbury Tales Favourite Bible stories retold by Archbishop Justin Welby The Good Samaritan A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he was attacked by robbers. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him and went away, leaving him half dead, halfway...

Anglican Mission in England Elects Two Suffragan Bishops

Anglican Mission in England Elects Two Suffragan Bishops The Anglican Mission in England (AMiE) met in Synod on 18 June.  While there, they elected two suffragan bishops to aid Bishop Andy Lines in providing episcopal oversight for the overall work.  Bishop Lines also...

Pride Flags Causing Conflict at Christian School

Pride Flags Cause Conflict at Christian School Conflict has broken out in a Christian school in Oxfordshire over the display of “Pride” flags. The institution in question is Kingham Hill School.  The same Trust (Kingham Hill Trust) oversees Oak Hill College, an...

Prayer Book Society Raising Funds to Put BCPs in the Hands of Choristers

Prayer Book Society Raising Funds to Put BCPs in the Hands of Choristers The Prayer Book Society, which will soon celebrate its 50th Anniversary, is raising funds to put a special edition BCP into the hands of junior choristers around the nation.   The idea came to...

Book Review: Reimagining Britain by Justin Welby

Reimagining Britain Foundations for Hope Justin Welby Bloomsbury, 2018, new edn. 2021 (ISBN: 978-1-4729-8497-5, 322pp, £12.99) The Archbishop of Canterbury has made several notable political interventions recently, including over ‘partygate’ and the Rwanda deportation...

Birthday of Anglicanism in America

Birthday of Anglicanism in America By the Revd Canon Chuck Collins June 16, 1607 was the birthday of Anglicanism in America. On this day Captain John Smith and 104 others celebrated the Lord’s Supper when they arrived safely in Jamestown, Virginia. Jamestown was the...

Barnabas Fund Report: Two ChiBok Girls Found

Barnabas Fund Reports Two Chibok Girls Found After 8 Years 24 June 2022 Two women, who were among hundreds of schoolgirls abducted by Boko Haram from the Nigerian town of Chibok eight years ago, have been found. Hauwa Joseph was discovered among a group of other...

New Bishop-elect for the Diocese of Cashel, Ferns & Ossory

Church of Ireland News New Bishop Elected for Cashel, Ferns & Ossory The Church of Ireland diocese of Cashel, Ferns, and Ossory now has a bishop-elect.  The Venerable Adrian Wilkinson, Archdeacon of Cork, Cloyne, and Ross was elected to succeed the Rt Revd Michael...

Editorial: Lessons to be Learned from the American Pro-Life Movement

Editorial Lessons to be Learned from American Pro-Life Movement Friday, 24 June 2022, the Feast of St John the Baptist, will be a date which will live in infamy amongst the supporters of abortion.  On that date, the US Supreme Court, overturned the precedent set by...

Church of Ireland Archbishops Issue Joint Statment on Easing of Covid Restrictions

Church of Ireland Archbishops Issue Joint Statement on the Easing of Covid Restrictions

Whilst Anglican churches in England, Scotland and Wales await the lifting of final Covid restrictions, the two Archbishops of the Church of Ireland have issued a joint statement about the unexpected easing of restrictions on both sides of the border.  All Covid restrictions have been removed for Northern Ireland and almost all have been for the Republic.

Archbishops John McDowell (Armagh) and Michael Jackson (Dublin) sent the following to the Church of Ireland.

“We write with great thankfulness to God and heartfelt gratitude to you, as we on this island begin to adjust to the lifting of public health restrictions on many aspects of our lives. The speed with which this has happened has taken many of us by surprise, and it will no doubt take some time for each of us to adjust, not only our social arrangements, but also our mental outlook in the months ahead.

“Of all the seasons of the year Spring comes most gradually; the anticipation we see in snow drops, then in cyclamen and daffodils. Then we notice the greater intensity and variety of birdsong at dawn and the vibrant loveliness of cherry blossom against still grey skies. Finally there comes the full opening up of leaves on the trees as the annual rebirth of nature arrives in its full form.

“This may be how it happens for us in terms of our greater participation in social and parish life, as we feel this renewed sense of optimism grow into the confidence that we are at a new point in our lives at which we can live with Covid–19, without imperilling our health services or putting vulnerable people in harm’s way.

“In our genuine sense of relief and perhaps enthusiasm to “get going again,” we need also to remember those for whom the past two years have been much more than an inconvenience or a nuisance. There are families who have lost loved ones in the most chilling of circumstances; all who have worked in the health services and in the care sector, often putting the welfare of others before their own well–being, along with those who have maintained education and other essential services at all levels. People who are utterly exhausted by the experience of worry, loneliness and stress over two long years cannot be left behind. Children and young people who have missed out on experiences which simply will not come round again need to be nurtured and encouraged.

We wish to thank all who have worked so hard in parishes up and down this island, both in maintaining the worship and witness of the Church and in serving their communities, often in partnership with other organisations. We also thank all who have worked and prayed and persevered. We have passed through a uniquely difficult time which has placed great demands on practical discipleship. And it has been for all of us a time when nothing could be taken for granted. Now we are emerging into the light.

“Risk assessments will continue to be a feature of parish life, and each of us, clergy and lay people, will need to make many judgements about exactly how and at what pace we move into our greater freedoms. At the same time there is a new sense of hope. There is an appropriateness in making this cautious journey through Lent and into Easter. Not in the sense of forty days of long faces, followed by an exhausted smile. Instead in a spirit of quiet preparation for the fullness of the resurrection light of Easter; God’s final and irrevocable act is that he has not let the world slip from his grasp, but has rescued and redeemed it in his Son.”

Previous

Next