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Welby in Danger of Losing primus inter pares Role over Same-Sex Blessings

CHURCH OF ENGLAND ‘BLESSING’ GAY UNIONS WOULD VIOLATE BIBLICAL TEACHING & JEOPARDISE ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY’S CONTINUING ROLE IN THE ANGLICAN COMMUNION  by Paul Eddy The Most Reverend Justin Badi, Primate of South Sudan, and Chairman of the GSFA responded,...

Letter: Bingo’s Ordination?

Letter Bingo’s Ordination? Dear Sir, The Church of England has been ordaining men for centuries, and since the 1990s has had legal authority to ordain women to the priesthood also. According to your recent report, the Revd Bingo Allison declared, "I’m not a man and...

Barnabas Aid Appeal for Democratic Republic of Congo

Barnabas Aid Appeal A bomb explosion ripped through the congregation at a baptismal service last Sunday evening (15 January 2023). Just after the baptisms had been performed, and while a blind pastor was expounding some Bible verses, the improvised explosive device...

Archbishops Differ on Practice if Not on Principle

Archbishops Differ on Practice if not on Principle Archbishop Justin Welby has revealed that he will not bless same-sex relationships, while Archbishop Stephen Cotterell has indicated his intention to do so. Explaining his decision, the Archbishop of Canterbury...

Pilgrim’s Process: Tone, Voice, & Speech

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Keene’s Review: Confirm, O Lord by Martin Davie

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Orthodox Anglican Provinces Invited to Covenant Members of the Fellowship

Orthodox Anglican Provinces Invited to Covenant Members of the Fellowship Global South May Provide Alternative Episcopal Oversight By Paul Eddy The GSFA has recently invited orthodox provinces across the Communion to formally sign up as full Covenant Members of the...

Diocese of Oxford’s “Bloated Bureaucracy” Under Fire

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Gist of Bishops’ Pastoral Letter Regarding Same-Sex Blessings

Gist of Bishops’ Pastoral Letter  New Prayers of Love and Faith We value and want to celebrate faithfulness in relationships. That is why we have drafted and asked the House of Bishops to further refine and commend a new resource to be used in churches, called Prayers...

The Queen’s Faith in Her Own Words

The Queen’s Faith – in Her Own Words

Its formal name was ‘Her Majesty’s Most Gracious Speech’. To the royal household, it was known as the QXB – the Queen’s Christmas broadcast. Queen Elizabeth II spoke about the significance of Christmas to more people than anyone else in history. Even before she acceded to the throne, she had a hand in expressing words of faith publicly.

In December 1939, as King George VI was preparing his first Christmas broadcast in wartime, his elder daughter, the thirteen-year-old Princess Elizabeth handed him a poem that she thought might be helpful. The King included an excerpt from it in his broadcast; it was the poem by Minnie Louise Haskins, containing these famous words:

I said to the man who stood at the gate of the year. “Give me a light that I may tread safely into the unknown. “ And he replied. “Go out into the darkness and put your hand into the hand of God. That shall be to you better than light and safer than a known way.”

Over the last twenty years or so, the Queen spoke more personally about her faith in her Christmas broadcasts, as can be seen in these quotations.

 

2000

Christmas is the traditional, if not the actual, birthday of a man who was destined to change the course of our history. And today we are celebrating the fact that Jesus Christ was born two thousand years ago; this is the true Millennium anniversary.

The simple facts of Jesus’ life give us little clue as to the influence he was to have on the world. As a boy he learnt his father’s trade as a carpenter. He then became a preacher, recruiting twelve supporters to help him.

But his ministry only lasted a few years and he himself never wrote anything down. In his early thirties he was arrested, tortured and crucified with two criminals. His death might have been the end of the story, but then came the resurrection and with it the foundation of the Christian faith.

Even in our very material age the impact of Christ’s life is all around us. If you want to see an expression of Christian faith you have only to look at our awe-inspiring cathedrals and abbeys, listen to their music, or look at their stained glass windows, their books and their pictures.

But the true measure of Christ’s influence is not only in the lives of the saints but also in the good works quietly done by millions of men and women day in and day out throughout the centuries.

To many of us our beliefs are of fundamental importance. For me the teachings of Christ and my own personal accountability before God provide a framework in which I try to lead my life. I, like so many of you, have drawn great comfort in difficult times from Christ’s words and example.

 

2002

I know just how much I rely on my own faith to guide me through the good times and the bad. Each day is a new beginning, I know that the only way to live my life is to try to do what is right, to take the long view, to give of my best in all that the day brings, and to put my trust in God. Like others of you who draw inspiration from your own faith, I draw strength from the message of hope in the Christian gospel.

 

2004

For me, as a Christian, one of the most important of these teachings is contained in the parable of the Good Samaritan, when Jesus answers the question, ‘Who is my neighbour?’ It is a timeless story of a victim of a mugging who was ignored by his own countrymen but helped by a foreigner – and a despised foreigner at that. The implication drawn by Jesus is clear. Everyone is our neighbour, no matter what race, creed or colour. The need to look after a fellow human being is far more important than any cultural or religious differences.

 

2011

Although we are capable of great acts of kindness, history teaches us that we sometimes need saving from ourselves – from our recklessness or our greed. God sent into the world a unique person – neither a philosopher nor a general, important though they are, but a Saviour, with the power to forgive… It is my prayer that on this Christmas day we might all find room in our lives for the message of the angels and for the love of God through Christ our Lord.

 

2012

This is the time of year when we remember that God sent his only son ‘to serve, not to be served’. He restored love and service to the centre of our lives in the person of Jesus Christ. It is my prayer this Christmas Day that his example and teaching will continue to bring people together to give the best of themselves in the service of others. The carol, In The Bleak Midwinter, ends by asking a question of all of us who know the Christmas story, of how God gave himself to us in humble service: ‘What can I give him, poor as I am? If I were a shepherd, I would bring a lamb; if I were a wise man, I would do my part’. The carol gives the answer: ‘Yet what I can I give him – give my heart’. 

 

2014

For me, the life of Jesus Christ, the Prince of Peace, whose birth we celebrate today, is an inspiration and an anchor in my life. A role model of reconciliation and forgiveness, he stretched out his hands in love, acceptance and healing. Christ’s example has taught me to seek to respect and value all people, of whatever faith or none.

 

2016

Jesus Christ lived obscurely for most of his life, and never travelled far. He was maligned and rejected by many, though he had done no wrong. And yet, billions of people now follow his teaching and find in him the guiding light for their lives. I am one of them because Christ’s example helps me see the value of doing small things with great love, whoever does them and whatever they themselves believe.

 

2018

The Christmas story retains its appeal since it doesn’t provide theoretical explanations for the puzzles of life. Instead, it’s about the birth of a child, and the hope that birth 2,000 years ago brought to the world. Only a few people acknowledged Jesus when he was born; now billions follow him. I believe his message of peace on earth and goodwill to all is never out of date. It can be headed by everyone. It’s needed as much as ever.

 

2021

It is this simplicity of the Christmas story that makes it so universally appealing: simple happenings that formed the starting point of the life of Jesus — a man whose teachings have been handed down from generation to generation, and have been the bedrock of my faith. His birth marked a new beginning.  As the carol says, “The hopes and fears of all the years are met in thee tonight”.

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