NEW

CDM Insurance from Ecclesiastical

CDM Insurance Clergy in the Church of England and Church in Wales can now purchase insurance to insulate them from the expenses associated with charges stemming from a Clergy Disciplinary Measure (CDM).  For £25 per year, Ecclesiastical Insurance now offers an...

Church of Scotland and Scottish Episcopal Church OK Saint Andrew Declaration

Church of Scotland and Scottish Episcopal Church Ok Saint Andrew Declaration The Declaration gives formal recognition of the way that both churches have ministered to the whole of Scotland for many years, and how they will continue to work together. It was also backed...

Jewel the Obscure: Advice to New Anglican Converts

Advice From Jewel the Obscure to New Anglican Converts I am often asked by those new to Anglicanism how to come to know what authentic Anglicanism is, in light of the confused mess that we see in North America, the UK and other places. I hope this helps. Unlike many...

Bishop of Burnley Trekking for Fundraising

Bishop of Burnley Trekking for Fundraising The Bishop of Burnley, Rt Revd Philip North, will be pulling on his walking boots this Friday and trekking east to west across the County of Lancashire … raising money towards the reopening of a redundant church hall as a...

Murcott: 12 Infallible Proofs

Murcott Twelve Infallible Proofs Ever since Christ’s Resurrection, the most unlikely tales and feeblest of fables have been propagated in an attempt to fracture the Christian faith. Yet, Acts 1:3 says that Christ showed Himself alive “by many infallible proofs”, being...

JC Ryle on Sickness

Bishop JC Ryle on Sickness Lord, he whom You love is sick!" John 11:3 The chapter from which this text is taken, is well known to all Bible readers. In life-like description, in touching interest, in sublime simplicity — there is no writing in existence that will bear...

Editorial: Church Matters Worthy of Further Notation

Church Matters Worthy of Further Notation Try as we might, we inevitably find ourselves not able to print all the stories that really are worthy of publication.  Such a matter is merely the by-product of limitation of space.  The ink is willing but the paper is weak. ...

John Calvin & The Church of England

John Calvin and the Church of England By Chuck Collins His writings and ideas so significantly influenced the Church of England that Anglicanism can be fairly described as not only generally Protestant, but “reformed.” John Calvin died on May 27, 1564, in Geneve,...

Anglicanism Explored: On Predestination

Anglicanism Explored: On Predestination By The Revd Dr Mark Pickles Popular evangelicalism is awash with “Arminianism”.  (Arminianism denies the doctrine of predestination claiming that although human beings are sinful they do have the ability to respond to the...

Chinese Communist Government Cracks Down on Christian Social Media

Communist Chinese Government Cracks Down on Christian Social Media China has continued its crackdown on Christian social media content, with the accounts of churches and Christian ministries removed from social media platform WeChat on 7 June. These include registered...

Trueman: “Assisted Catechetical Suicide–Anglican Style”

The ever insightful and pithy, Revd Dr Carl Trueman, Professor of Biblical & Religious Studies at Grove City College in Pennsylvania, had some thoughts on the recent instructions the Church of England issued regarding school assemblies.  His full comment can be found in First Things.  

The Church of England instructions that prompted the essay follows:

“Parents, pupils and adults can expect to encounter worship that is consistently invitational. There should be no compulsion to “do anything.” Rather, worship should provide the opportunity to engage whilst allowing the freedom of those of different faiths and those who profess no religious faith to be present and to engage with integrity. The metaphor of “warm fires and open doors” captures this idea. The warmth of the fire derives from the clarity and authenticity of the Christian message at its heart. There is no value to an encounter with a watered down, lowest common denominator version of faith. Importantly the door is open, all are welcome to come in and sit as near or as far away from the fire as they feel comfortable. Pupils and adults should always only be invited to pray if they wish to do so and should be invited to pray in their own way. Prayer should always be accompanied by the option to reflect.”

Trueman then opines:

“While I agree that there is nothing to be gained from an encounter with a watered-down version of the Christian faith, I do not know how a robust statement of faith can find expression in worship that allows those of other faiths and those of no faith to “engage with integrity.” And if we are looking for New Testament metaphors that draw on images of combustion when describing worship, the letter to the Hebrews offers us a fine one: “Let us offer to God acceptable worship, with reverence and awe, for our God is a consuming fire” (Heb. 12:28–29).

And that, of course, brings us to the document’s core problem: It is trying to marry Christian worship to the spirit of this present age. The New Testament authors saw worship as a response to a holy God, an act that is rendered problematic by humanity’s sin and is thus possible only through the work of God himself in Christ. In other words, the gospel at its very core is, in a way, exclusive—something about which early Christians felt no embarrassment. Their God was awesome in the sense that an earthquake or a thunderstorm is awesome. Our modern age wants God to be awesome in the sense of a favourite teen girl band.

The document contains other ridiculous statements. The idea that the service should involve pupils in planning, leading, and evaluation is characteristic of an age that worships the alleged wisdom of youth and that has also made worship juvenile.

“This document is assisted catechetical suicide, Anglican-style—one that in its squirming embarrassment about Christian exclusivity buries the gospel under a pile of inclusive blather, and squanders the great heritage of Anglican liturgy and hymnody.”

Previous

Next