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Letter to the Editor: Welcome the Afghani Refugees but Know the Problems

Welcome the Afghani Refugees But Know the Problems   Dear Sir, There is widespread sympathy for resettling Afghans into Britain fleeing from tyranny and persecution and I am supportive of it. Many of them are Muslims and will have every facility to follow their...

Letter to the Editor: Irrational Optimism

  Irrational Optimism Dear Sir, I read the latest [anon.] article from Anglican Futures, EC8087. It is helpful and clear but, for me, there is a deep undercurrent of a seemingly determined [irrational?] optimism. The article outlines the overall workings of...

Letter to the Editor: Covid Restrictions

  Covid Restrictions Dear Sir,  I refer to the letter in Issue 8084 entitled ‘Power belongeth unto Christ’ which Scripturally outlines where all power belongs and exposes the inconsistencies of our Government and their COVID restrictions on the public worship of...

Free Presbyterians Protest COP26 Visit of Pope Francis

Free Presbyterians Protest COP26 visit of Pope Francis  The Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland has sent a protest to the First Minister urging her to resist political and diplomatic ties with the Pope, ahead of the COP26 summit of world leaders in Glasgow in...

Episcopal Church Pays $4,500,000 to Diocese of Ft Worth

Episcopal Church Pays $4,500,000 to Diocese of Fort Worth, Texas By Suzanne Gill With encouragement from the 141st District Court, the Diocese entered into mediation with The Episcopal Church (TEC) in early June to settle claims of the Diocese for attorneys’ fees and...

Report from Anglican Ink on Episcopal Church Legal Spending

Report from Anglican Ink on Episcopal Church Legal Spending By Jeff Walton This report follows on the announcement that the Diocese of Fort Worth received $4,500,000 from the Episcopal Church to cover the expenses incurred by the Diocese after it left the Episcopal...

Pilgrim’s Process: Common Grace by Peter Sanlon

Pilgrim’s Process  By Peter Sanlon Common Grace Loving God is so important for satisfaction and joy in life, that it is easy to mistakenly think only spiritual concerns are important in life. There are many ways for this error to arise: We can think the only truly...

Church in Wales Embraces the Zeitgeist

The Church in Wales Embraces the Zeitgeist Meeting on Monday 6 September, the Governing Body of the Church in Wales, voted to approve same-sex blessings but stopped short of approving marriage. The change does not allow for same-sex marriages in a Church in Wales...

The History of Christianity in Britain and Ireland

The History of Christianity in Britain and Ireland From the first century to the twenty-first Gerald Bray Apollos, 2021 (ISBN: 978-1-78974-120-9, 693pp) Throughout his long academic career Bray has ably straddled both doctrine and ecclesiastical history, so it is no...

Anglican Futures: Knitted Together In Love

Anglican Futures "Knitted together in love" - Should Christian Communities be 'Thicker'? The terms 'thick' and 'thin' have been used by sociologists and political scientists to describe cultures  for decades.  Thick cultures are socio-centric; they tend to be...

Letter to the Editor: The Church of England is Sinking

Dear Sir:

For many years I have wondered who has ultimate authority in the Church of England—General Synod or Archbishops.  The epidemic has given no answer as both left over-burdened parish priests to keep a ministry alive.

Archbishops might be excused for leaving the State to decide what could be done in church, but there is no excuse for not defending the legality of their own marriage contract, “let no man put asunder” and letting so many couples endure extreme distress.  If those words lack authenticity, what about those of the Absolution or consecration of the elements at Holy Communion?

General Synod has no direct connection with church members and priests not on the synodical ladder.  It is a dangerous collection of free spirits accountable to no-one for their decisions.  Two have been disastrous.  Allowing dioceses to appropriate money left to churches in wills and trusts impoverished and ruined scores of village churches which had small congregations but a steady income from investments.  

The second, trampled over traditions and theological beliefs by ordaining women without a referendum.  There is lingering resentment; was this the will of God or the success of the most powerful pressure group in Church House?

A third, is likely to be another disaster; setting a quota for priests from ethnic groups is racial discrimination in reverse and an insult to suggest they not be selected on merit.  Would they be tainted with the suspicion that they had been “pushed through” on the quota system?  The Church is jumping on the to the latest social movement.

I am a ninety-year old survivor of World War II, growing up in a Kent village with a church which never closed, even when bomb damaged or during the Battle of Britain.  For fifty-four years, I have been married to a priest who adheres to the principles of the Church into which he was ordained, but it is difficult.  I am also the great-niece of Bishop Frank Partridge, whose portrait hangs in London’s Church House.  If still available, General Synod members should read his preface in the book published at the time of its completion.  It high-lights the spiritual vision built into every bit of Church House.

Mrs J K Young

Morpeth

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